Wild Hunt Studios creates original tabletop role-playing games, and illustrations for your games, and is committed to the ideals of independent publishing and creator-ownership.

WHS is currently publishing material for 3rd Edition Dungeons & Dragons and a mini-supplement for the indie RPG Sorcerer entitled Electric Ghosts.




Wild Hunt News


The Primordial Age of Demons
November 3rd, 2014

I’ve been playing Tony Dowler’s “How to Host a Dungeon” the last few nights, and realized it would be interesting to record my results for each Age in terms of a potential campaign setting, beginning with the Primordial.

I rolled a river with multiple waterfalls, some mithril deposits, ancient beasts near to the surface, and a demon civilization deep under the earth–which lasted only one season before erupting upwards without interacting with anything else. At the end of the Age, earthquakes caused multiple rifts intersecting the river.

Then I spent some time thinking about what all that meant for the developing dungeon, eventually moving away from the idea I was just developing a single dungeon here. At least in this portion. This felt more like a chance for world creation.

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Niflgap Now Available
July 1st, 2014

It is time! Vikings! Zombies! Spaceships!

Sail the black tides of the cosmos in “Niflgap.”

Pelgrane Press has released the latest “Series Pitch of the Month” for the DramaSystem, Raven Daegmorgan’s Niflgap, based on ideas from his long-unpublished RPG, Dead*Space: as the universe dies, you, the fractious Norse gods, set forth in starships from lonesome Midgaard, hoping to find salvation in the void where armies of the hungry dead writhe endless beneath black suns.

You can order Niflgap, and all the other great pitches, from the Pelgrane Store. Look under ‘Other Publications’.


The Walhkrevt’s Well
May 22nd, 2014

An homage to Undermountain and the mega-dungeons…


On an exposed outcrop high on a stony mountainside there is a broad pit. The pit is ringed by a low stone lip carven with all manner of gargoyles and obscene figures; swaying over it is a heavy black bucket large enough to fit two men, suspended with thick cables from a sturdy-but-worn wooden frame. A great, iron winch carven with skulls beckons. None know who maintains the apparatus, only that it is.

To those few mountain-dwellers of the area, this place is called the Well, but no one draws water forth from its depths. Only evil.

Were a brave or foolish soul to descend in the bucket (as some have), they would find someone–something–has carven rooms and burrowed tunnels through the casement all along the descent into the nethermost-depths; each entry along the way down leading to new complex of rooms: some small, some large, and some sprawling. The Well holds level-upon-level of cursed dungeons and cavern lairs, each holding horrors independent of the others. And at the very bottom…

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A Paladin of Tyr
August 6th, 2013

When I was ten, I probably wouldn’t have imagined my go-to character in computer role-playing games would end up being a woman.

Back in the late 80’s, a cRPG called “Pool of Radiance” was put out by Strategic Simulations Incorporated (SSI for short). The game used the rules from the Advanced Dungeons & Dragons tabletop RPG, and was the first computer game to do so. I played it on a green-monochromed Apple IIe screen.

In those days, there was a limited “story line”, and virtually no interaction with NPCs, so a great deal was left to the imagination. Nor were there pre-crafted characters to pick from who joined your party, instead you created each member of your party from a large set of options, exactly like you would in the tabletop game.

One of the characters I created was a red-haired female paladin of Tyr, the daughter of a noble house, whom I named Brinna D’Vere.

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RPG Blog Carnival — Fantastic Creations
June 1st, 2013

Keith J. Davies was running the RPG Blog Carnival again about a month ago and invited me to toss my hat into the ring, but I ended up waffling on writing an entry because I’d been unable to decide what makes a creation “fantastic” when one of D&D’s basic tomes is full of examples of “fantastic” creations: swords, rings, books, potions, dusts, oils and paints, even machines, and so forth. All of which have amazing effects and powers. (Referring, of course, to the Dungeon Master’s Guides and their treasure lists, particularly in 1st Edition.)

Perhaps what we are looking for is, instead, a solution to +1 swords and [things] of [spell effects]; that is, to the problem of magic items being perceived and treated like eminently disposable accoutrements.

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